twenty-second week

Our Catholic Mass has a melodic rhythm to it. An Order. A Beauty. This week’s Prayers have been particularly moving to me and have stirred my heart to wondrous examinations. I have been grateful to recite them, to lift them up, to enfold them into my Spirit. May you too find a little nugget of peace for yourself as you read them & may all that we’ve gathered in our hearts remain with us, even as we move into a new series of prayers during the Twenty-Third Week…

Every Mass there is The Order of Mass. When the people are gathered, the Priest approaches the altar with the ministers while the Entrance Antiphon is sung or recited.

The Twenty-Second week in Ordinary Time Entrance Antiphon: Have Mercy on me, O Lord, for I cry to you all the day long. O Lord, you are good and forgiving, full of mercy to all who call to you.

And all pray in silence with the Priest for a while. Then the Priest, with hands extended, says the Collect prayer.

The Twenty-Second week in Ordinary Time Collect: God of might, giver of every good gift, put into our hearts the love of your name, so that, by deepening our sense of reverence, you may nurture in us what is good and, by your watchful care, keep safe what you have nurtured. Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.

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I’d rather

“I’d rather be physically alone and have spiritual peace to be what GOD wants me to be than to conform to co-dependency on that which takes me further away from being authentically and wholly whom God formed me to be. “

Karla, from Flannel with Faith
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trust in me

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Just another Wednesday posting

for Saint Maria Faustina KoWalska (what else,)

with a brief reflection on the Divine Mercy of God,

which comes directly to you from a recent reflection by…

The Congregation of the Sisters of Our Lady of Mercy, one of whose foundresses was Saint Sr. Faustina Kowalska herself!

The word trust in the school of St. Faustina’s spirituality signifies the attitude of man towards God. In the signature of the image, which Jesus ordered her to paint, are the words: Jesus, I trust in You!

Trust is the first response of man to knowing and experiencing the attentive merciful love of God. This word has unusually rich contents because it signifies not only faith in the existence of God, in His omnipotence, in the truths revealed through Him, but it also denotes an all-embracing attitude of man towards God, which expresses the fulfillment of God’s will contained in the commandments, in the duties of our state of life, as well as in the recognised inspirations of the Holy Spirit.

In the writings of Sister Faustina, trust is identical with the biblical conception of faith and so it means entrustment of our own life to God as the best Father who does not desire anything other than man’s temporal and eternal happiness.

God’s will – as Sister Faustina often used to say – is for us mercy itself. It is the fulfillment of God’s will that is a concrete measure of trust towards God. The Lord Jesus said to Sister Faustina, The graces of My mercy are drawn by means of one vessel only, and that is trust. The more a soul trusts, the more it will receive. Souls that trust boundlessly are a great comfort to Me, because I pour all the treasures of My graces into them. I rejoice that they ask for much, because it is my desire to give much, very much. On the other hand, I am sad when souls ask for little, when they narrow their hearts (Diary 1578).

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